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SLS vs 2LS ?

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  • SLS vs 2LS ?

    I'm wondering if anyone has experience of using the Velocette Single Leading shoe brake, and then converting to a Twin Leading Shoe brake.
    It's always amazed me how effective the li'l ol' SLS brake is, other similar brit brakes can be pathetic, (read BSA for a start!) but Velo really got this right. But I haven't used a TLS Thruxton type brake.
    Can anyone give us a comparo?

  • #2
    hi Jools, in theory the TLS brake should be better That is if comparing a 7.5" Velo SLS to a Velo manufactured TLS.
    I agree Absolutely nothing wrong with the sls velo brake.
    I did put a TLS supplied by Grove into my venom- It was an absolute disaster as delivered. The lining thickness was 3/16 which is probably standard My drum measured correctly as well.
    However, I think the cams were machined incorrectly as the operating arms went way past 90 degrees reducing mechanical advantage.Brake was lethal in a non stopping way .
    I had to strip off the new linings and have 1/4" ones installed. Then put a ..020 shim under each cam and turn the linings down to 7.5.
    Then I had a really good brake.
    Of course i was fed the standard line from Brit suppliers "You are the only guy ever to complain about that problem"-

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    • #3
      My Venom has the single leading shoe brake. The only modification that I made when I put the bike together 30 years ago was to use a Triumph Trident clutch cable instead of the wimpy cable that Velo used. I also made the cable run as short and direct as I could without having issues from the suspension. I think the stock length is too long and asks for flex. My brake works fine. It is not a modern brake but it is more than adequate. A few years after I put the bike together, I had the opportunity to swap rides with a fellow who had just had his Thruxton restored. His double leading shoe front brake had the wimpy, long cable. I was not pushing his freshly restored bike, but the brake did not impress. He, on the other hand, was quite impressed with my brake. He wanted to know what "secrets" I had to make the brake work so well. He assumed I had special linings or complex set ups. He was disappointed when I told him it was just a different cable. Don't know if he ever changed his.

      Ed from NJ

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      • #4
        Yes the cable can make a difference. At least we don't have a dopey cable like the one on a Triumph / BSA TLS front brake (the second type with the big airscoop), where some clever engineer decided that he'd put the brake light switch IN the cable. The return spring in the switch ensured there was always plenty of slop in the brake, as you had to pull the switch on before anything at all happened down below!

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        • #5
          Another point worth keeping in mind is the measurement at the handlebar lever .... fulcrum .... center line of the cable nipple to the lever pivot bolt, Norton levers typically used 7/8", beyond that increased the force necessary to pull in the lever. I don' t know if Velocette published such a measurement .

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          • #6
            Bit off-topic but worth mentioning, the Velo clutch lever must have 1 1/8" pivot to Nipple.

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            • #7
              Another important factor is ensuring the O.D. of the brake linings is the same as the I.D. of the brake drum. Associated with this checking the 'roundness' of the drum. It can be distorted through age and spoke tension. The only way to do it correctly is to turn the inside of the drum AFTER wheel building or truing the wheel. I had an issue with my '69 Bonny, as in the brake was terrible, weak and dead feeling. After going through the above procedure it was transformed into a brake that worked well and was really powerful. Also, modern friction material is a vast improvement over what was originally used.

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              • #8
                And even better, if you have the facilities, is to also machine the actual brake shoes so they are perfectly round when the lever is pulled.
                Involves setting up the brakeplate with shoes fitted, in a lathe with shimming underneath the opening cam, so the shoes are slightly open, simulating the point where the shoes meet the drum when the lever is pulled.
                Ensures you get full contact.

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                • #9
                  Absolutely. It is a job for a specialist, not many home mechanics have access to a lathe that can swing a motorcycle wheel! I can't recall who did my Bonny brake now, but there are specialists out there who still do this job. I'll be having the Vipers brake done for next season, as I recall it wasn't that good the last time I rode it.

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                  • #10
                    I use saftek for my linings https://saftek.co.uk/friction-produc...-applications/ you would have a job to improve on the material choice and the turnaround time
                    they also did a full disk both side lining of my KSS clutch plate instead of all those corks

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                    • #11
                      I've still got (after all these years), a couple of bags full of those lovely old corks, but I reckon (hate to admit it) you're right mate... go for the bonded option.

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